Science Diction

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Detailed Information

What does the word “meme” have to do with evolutionary biology? And why do we call it “Spanish flu” when it was never Spanish? Science Diction is a podcast about words—and the science stories within them. If you like your language with a side of science, Science Diction has you covered.

Sample Podcast

Quarantine has been on many of our minds lately. The phrases “shelter in place” and “self-quarantine” have filled up our news, social media, and conversations since the first inklings of the coronavirus pandemic. But this is far from the first time cities and countries have used the practice of physical separation to battle the spread of disease.

You might think of Mary Mallon, who many know as “Typhoid Mary.” In the early 1900s, she spent nearly 30 years in a cottage on a small island in New York City’s East River, all to prevent her from infecting others. But we’ve been using quarantine for millennia—well before we even understood germs existed and that they can be transmitted from person-to-person. And the origin of the word stretches all the way back to the mid-14th century, when Europe was swept by one of the biggest losses of human life in history: the Black Death.

Level
Grade 4 / Year 5, Grade 5 / Year 6, Grade 6 / Year 7, Grade 7 / Year 8, Grade 8 / Year 9, Grade 9 / Year 10, Grade 10 / Year 11, Grade 11 / Year 12, Grade 12 / Year 13
Type
Website/Online tool for Student
Price
Always Free
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